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Jun 12
bauldoff:

Remember the QLOCKTWO typographic clock by Biegert & Funk from almost three years ago? There is now a desktop/alarm incarnation, as well as a new wristwatch edition, which will be available Autumn 2012.
via NOTCOT

bauldoff:

Remember the QLOCKTWO typographic clock by Biegert & Funk from almost three years ago? There is now a desktop/alarm incarnation, as well as a new wristwatch edition, which will be available Autumn 2012.

via NOTCOT

Jun 12
thepoliticalnotebook:

The Special Investigator General for Iraq Reconstruction’s latest quarterly report is out today. And I always recommend reading these reports, they’re chock full of data and information on a wide range of things, from Iraqi public opinion, and trends in the security situation, to the ability of the US government to document its funds.
Here are some of the best/most interesting and important bits (read: I read it, so if you really aren’t in the mood, you don’t have to):
On January 4th of this year, the State Dept refused SIGIR’s request for “information pursuant to the activities it conducted pursuant to the US-Iraq Strategic Framework Agreement.” The SFA essentially governs the US’s interactions and relationship with Iraq now that they are no longer home to our troops, so that’s no small thing.
A Gallup poll of Iraqis showed that reports of low quality of life were much higher this year. When asked this September about their situations, 25% of respondents rated themselves as “suffering,” up from 14% in October of 2010. SIGIR reports that this can be connected back to the low quality of essential services in Iraq, like electricity.
On that subject - electricity is a big issue in Iraq, and has been for some time. When polled, more Iraqis think the pervasive lack of access to electricity should be the top priority for the government than think security should top the list. The average Iraqi household only gets 7.6 hours a day of electricity.
The DoD could only provide supporting documentation for $1bn of the $3bn provided to it under the Development Fund for Iraq for making contract payments. (This is such a shock…)
The number of contracting employees of US agencies in Iraq fell by 72% since last year.
Baghdad was declared the “world’s least safe city” by Mercer, but there have been some noticeable improvements in things like level of foreign investment, access to electricity and levels of violence.
Seriously, these are only a few things from this report. Look through the whole thing, particularly Section 4. If anything, read it for all the amazing, useful, to-die-for infographics and charts.
Some links to things mentioned in the report:
The US-Iraq Strategic Framework Agreement
Iraq’s first release of information as part of its involvement in the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative
The World Bank’s Doing Business 2012 report
The 2012 Consolidated Appropriations Act
Mercer’s 2011 Quality of Life report city rankings

thepoliticalnotebook:

The Special Investigator General for Iraq Reconstruction’s latest quarterly report is out today. And I always recommend reading these reports, they’re chock full of data and information on a wide range of things, from Iraqi public opinion, and trends in the security situation, to the ability of the US government to document its funds.

Here are some of the best/most interesting and important bits (read: I read it, so if you really aren’t in the mood, you don’t have to):

  • On January 4th of this year, the State Dept refused SIGIR’s request for “information pursuant to the activities it conducted pursuant to the US-Iraq Strategic Framework Agreement.” The SFA essentially governs the US’s interactions and relationship with Iraq now that they are no longer home to our troops, so that’s no small thing.
  • A Gallup poll of Iraqis showed that reports of low quality of life were much higher this year. When asked this September about their situations, 25% of respondents rated themselves as “suffering,” up from 14% in October of 2010. SIGIR reports that this can be connected back to the low quality of essential services in Iraq, like electricity.
  • On that subject - electricity is a big issue in Iraq, and has been for some time. When polled, more Iraqis think the pervasive lack of access to electricity should be the top priority for the government than think security should top the list. The average Iraqi household only gets 7.6 hours a day of electricity.
  • The DoD could only provide supporting documentation for $1bn of the $3bn provided to it under the Development Fund for Iraq for making contract payments. (This is such a shock…)
  • The number of contracting employees of US agencies in Iraq fell by 72% since last year.
  • Baghdad was declared the “world’s least safe city” by Mercer, but there have been some noticeable improvements in things like level of foreign investment, access to electricity and levels of violence.
  • Seriously, these are only a few things from this report. Look through the whole thing, particularly Section 4. If anything, read it for all the amazing, useful, to-die-for infographics and charts.

Some links to things mentioned in the report:

Jun 12
nythroughthelens:

Instagram and photo sharing. ABC No Rio. Lower East Side, New York City.

Are any of you on Instagram? I finally broke down and started using Instagram a few days ago (before the big news yesterday) and I have to say I am really into it. My name there is newyorklens. It reminds me a lot of when I first started using Tumblr actually which was my very first foray into the world of photo sharing!

I have read so many rants against Instagram that cover all sorts of sociological, aesthetic and technological concerns regarding either the propensity for sharing and oversharing as well as dislike of the filters on Instagram.

I find Instagram freeing to some extent. As someone who has very little money and has had to work with the limitations of my own (lack of) fabulous camera equipment over the past few years, I have to say that I can understand the appeal of phone photography in general. I have never been a person to turn my nose up at phone photography because I understand that this is a way for people to express themselves with the tool(s) they have available. I even know photographers who own other cameras but choose to focus on phone photography because they love the challenge and immediate quality of it. 

Is there perceived mediocrity with phone photography (and on Instagram and other photo sharing sites/apps)? Of course. But there is perceived mediocrity in the field of regular photography where “real” cameras are utilized (real in quotes for obvious reasons related to the context of this post) and on all of the photo-sharing sites and services that currently exist. 

Something that I enjoy about Instagram is that I get to share the quirkier things I see in my everyday travels that may or may not end up in my traditional photography. This photo for example was taken quickly yesterday while on the way back to my apartment which is nearby. It’s one of my favorite facades on the Lower East Side and I loved how the sunlight was illuminating it.

 Is this photo any less than a photo I may have taken with my regular camera? What if I post-processed a traditional digital photo to look exactly like this (I happen to actually love the effect). Would that make it anymore worthwhile to the people who make protestations about the filters used in phone photography?

I won’t be posting my Instagram photos all that much because I enjoy the process of revealing them on Instagram and interacting with them there and later on Flickr where I end up sharing them (my folder of my recent Instagram photos is here: New York City Instagram Photos) but I wanted to open up a discourse regarding the broader implications of mobile photo sharing.

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For reference, ABC No Rio is a collectively-run center for art and activism on the Lower East Side. It was founded in 1980 by artists committed to political and social engagement with the goal to facilitate cross-pollination between artists and activists.


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If you didn’t see my initial contest entry post for the current Artists Wanted photography contest, you can still help me out by going to my contest entry page and clicking collect me

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View this photo larger and on black on my Google Plus page


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View my photography for sale here, email me, or ask for help.

nythroughthelens:

Instagram and photo sharing. ABC No Rio. Lower East Side, New York City.

Are any of you on Instagram? I finally broke down and started using Instagram a few days ago (before the big news yesterday) and I have to say I am really into it. My name there is newyorklens. It reminds me a lot of when I first started using Tumblr actually which was my very first foray into the world of photo sharing!

I have read so many rants against Instagram that cover all sorts of sociological, aesthetic and technological concerns regarding either the propensity for sharing and oversharing as well as dislike of the filters on Instagram.

I find Instagram freeing to some extent. As someone who has very little money and has had to work with the limitations of my own (lack of) fabulous camera equipment over the past few years, I have to say that I can understand the appeal of phone photography in general. I have never been a person to turn my nose up at phone photography because I understand that this is a way for people to express themselves with the tool(s) they have available. I even know photographers who own other cameras but choose to focus on phone photography because they love the challenge and immediate quality of it.

Is there perceived mediocrity with phone photography (and on Instagram and other photo sharing sites/apps)? Of course. But there is perceived mediocrity in the field of regular photography where “real” cameras are utilized (real in quotes for obvious reasons related to the context of this post) and on all of the photo-sharing sites and services that currently exist.

Something that I enjoy about Instagram is that I get to share the quirkier things I see in my everyday travels that may or may not end up in my traditional photography. This photo for example was taken quickly yesterday while on the way back to my apartment which is nearby. It’s one of my favorite facades on the Lower East Side and I loved how the sunlight was illuminating it.

Is this photo any less than a photo I may have taken with my regular camera? What if I post-processed a traditional digital photo to look exactly like this (I happen to actually love the effect). Would that make it anymore worthwhile to the people who make protestations about the filters used in phone photography?

I won’t be posting my Instagram photos all that much because I enjoy the process of revealing them on Instagram and interacting with them there and later on Flickr where I end up sharing them (my folder of my recent Instagram photos is here: New York City Instagram Photos) but I wanted to open up a discourse regarding the broader implications of mobile photo sharing.

—-

For reference, ABC No Rio is a collectively-run center for art and activism on the Lower East Side. It was founded in 1980 by artists committed to political and social engagement with the goal to facilitate cross-pollination between artists and activists.

—-

If you didn’t see my initial contest entry post for the current Artists Wanted photography contest, you can still help me out by going to my contest entry page and clicking collect me

—-

View this photo larger and on black on my Google Plus page

—-

View my photography for sale here, email me, or ask for help.
Jun 12

senchainc:

Sencha Touch 2 Developer Preview, Available Now

This video shows a side-by-side comparison of the Kitchen Sink demo orientation change on an Android Motorola Atrix in Touch 1.1 and in our latest version of Touch 2. The new layout engine in Touch 2 is so fast we had to use a high speed camera to measure it. We shot this video at 120 frames per second, then slowed the video down to ¼ speed so you can see the detail.

Sencha Touch 2 features performance updates across the board — In load time, scrolling speed, and rendering (especially on Android). Additionally, we have a whole new documentation app, which is easier to use, includes more resources, and features 11 new guides. Lastly, this release includes Native Packaging in our SDK tools, allowing you to publish your web app to the iOS App Store and Android Marketplace.

Learn more about Sencha Touch 2

Download Sencha Touch 2 today!

Jun 12

nythroughthelens:

Humanities Magazine January/February 2012 - New York City photography by Vivienne Gucwa.

Central Park, New York City

I came home today to a copy of Humanities Magazine for January/February 2012 waiting in my mailbox that contains two of my Central Park photos. I was contacted for usage of these photos a while back so it was nice to see them in print finally!

Humanities Magazine is the official magazine of the National Endowment for the Humanities. I was really psyched to work with them because I strongly support their efforts. The NEH gives grants to cultural institutions such as museums, archives, libraries, colleges, universities, public television, radio stations and individual scholars. These various grants strengthen teaching and learning in the humanities in schools and colleges across the nation, facilitate research, preserve and provide access to cultural and educational resources and strengthen the institutional base of the humanities. Source

The article my photos accompany is called: Public Parking by Anna Maria Gillis and is about Frederick Law Olmstead, the co-designer of Central Park and it centers around his fondness for designing pastoral escapes for the urban masses of New York City in Central Park.

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View the entire set here (larger and on black): Humanities Magazine - January/February 2012 - Vivienne Gucwa’s photography

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View my store, email me, or ask for help.

Jun 12

Sci-Fi Hi-Fi: Jim Ray asks: Honest question: have you found New York, center of the... →

irondavy:

Admission: I’m a Bay Area native that’s spent the last year living and working in New York City. Interpet bias as you will, I confess to having a far more emotional tie to California than an intellectual one.

buzz:

I think part of the problem with [San Francisco] is that there’s absolutely nothing in the culture that puts the brakes on people’s narcissism. It is, by its very nature, an infinitely gentle, endlessly indulgent place that encourages people to believe at every turn that they are exceptional human beings for having been enlightened enough to make their home in God’s perfect paradise at the dawning of the Age of the Technological Aquarius.

Buzz and I talked about this over drinks a few months ago and it’s been simmering in the back of my head ever since. See, I agree with every single one of Buzz’s observations, but my conclusion is the complete opposite.

Buzz writes:

There are plenty of terrible people in New York, of course, but their narcissistic leanings tend to be kept in check by […] frankly, the willingness (some might say eagerness) of New Yorkers to censure bad behavior.

Doesn’t this promote far more homogeneity, not less?

California is gentle and tolerant, but to me that’s the more honest route. I don’t relate at all to the notion that one should be calling others out on their bullshit. Life is far too vast and one’s personal experiences are far too narrow for me to feel comfortable with the idea that anyone has it all figured out. To suggest otherwise seems like the narcissistic route.

Besides, I think there’s actually a real value to stumbling into things wide-eyed and ignorant, unsure of who and what to believe.  Jeff Veen once told me that he credits a lot of his success to not knowing what he was getting into. By the time the problems inherent in type licensing and technology became clear, Typekit had enough momentum to overcome them.

More broadly, this is the reason why incumbents rarely continue to innovate. They know too much, and box themselves into predetermined modes of perception. The flip side to never saying someone is crazy is never saying they’re right.

Bay Area startups like Airbnb, Uber, Netflix, and, indeed, Square, are emblematic of this attitude. Why shouldn’t we aim our sights high and disrupt whole industries? Sure, we may have no idea what we’re doing, but Zelda wouldn’t be fun if we had complete maps of all the dungeons. This doesn’t extend from exceptionalism to me. It’s actually the opposite: an admission that all is fragile and temporary, and that small forces can be large agents of change. 

Okay, I may have toppled my whole premise here with a Zelda metaphor, but it’d make me happier if we could appreciate that cities and their cultures don’t have to be better than each other. I would wager that most of us in either area are visiting the other on a regular basis, not to mention following each other, working with each other remotely, reading the same blogs, going to the same conferences, getting inspired by the same stuff. We might be on opposite coasts, but the real distance between us is shrinking. It’s probably for the best that we keep those qualities that make us unique, and come to appreciate that we may hold different parts of the Triforce but it’s only in their unison that Ganon may be slain.

Jun 12
newsflick:

A full moon rises behind the New York City skyline seen from Eagle Rock Reservation in West Orange, N.J., Friday, April 6, 2012. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)
Jun 12
newsflick:

Mexico raises alert for Popocatepetl volcano: A smoke cloud from the Popocatepetl volcano is seen from the town of San Andres Cholula, Mexico, on April 16, 2012. The volcano has been emitting gas and water vapor between 500 and 1000 meters in height according to a report from the National Center for Disaster Prevention.
Jun 12

France, England Duel to a Draw

Although separated by just 21 miles by the English Channel, the fortunes of English and French national soccer could not be further apart so far in 2012. England have changed coaches, suffered key injuries to players, and have had to deal with claims of racism within the camp - not to mention that they’ll be without star player Wayne Rooney for the first two games of Euro 2012.

By contrast, France is coming into the game on the back of a 4-0 beating of Estonia, which extended Laurent Blanc’s unbeaten run as coach to 21 matches.

But this is French football - there was a mutiny among the players at the 2010 World Cup and a loss to then-relative unknowns Senegal in the 2002 World Cup despite being the reigning World and European Champions. Les Bleus have generally been searching for a new direction since Zinedine Zidane retired.

But things don’t look great for England ahead of the opening game of Group D, with Roy Hodgson’s team having lost four of their last five games against their old rivals to the east. England went unbeaten in qualifying, winning five and drawing three of their eight matches - but that was with Frank Lampard, Rio Ferdinand and Rooney who are all missing for a variety of reasons.

England has never won the European Championship, and didn’t even qualify for the last tournament in Austria and Switzerland. England’s best result in the tournament came in 1996, when they were hosts when they lost on penalty kicks to Germany in the semifinals.

France has won the Euros twice, first in 1984 when they were the hosts, when current UEFA President Michel Platini was the tournament’s top scorer and best player. Their second tournament victory came in 2000 when they beat Italy 2-1 in the final, becoming the first reigning World Cup winners to also win the Euros.

The game in Donetsk, Ukraine should see England try to establish a new identity, while France will look to build on their recent run of good results. It’s forecast to be a little cagey - but my predictions are notoriously terrible, so look for a 4-3 French win!

Jun 12